AAHA

AAHA

Hope Veterinary Care has achieved the highest level of veterinary excellence following a thorough evaluation by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). We earned AAHA accreditation after a rigorous review of the hospital’s practice protocols, medical equipment, facility and client service.

Unlike human hospitals, not all animal hospitals are required to be accredited.

Accredited hospitals are the only hospitals that choose to be evaluated on approximately 900 quality standards that go above and beyond basic state regulations, ranging from patient care and pain management to staff training and advanced diagnostic services. AAHA-accredited hospitals are recognized among the finest in the industry, and are consistently at the forefront of advanced veterinary medicine. AAHA standards are continuously reviewed and updated to keep accredited practices on the cutting edge of veterinary excellence.

Pet owners look for AAHA-accredited hospitals because they value their pet’s health and trust the consistent, expert care provided by the entire health care team. At AAHA-accredited practices, pet owners can expect to receive the highest quality care from well-trained, professional veterinary teams.

Only the top small animal hospitals in the United States and Canada have achieved accreditation by the Association. To maintain accredited status, [Hospital Name] must continue to be evaluated regularly by AAHA.

For more information about accreditation, visit aaha.org/petowner, or connect on Facebook and “like” the American Animal Hospital Association.

Fear Free

Fear Free

We are proud to have Fear Free certified professionals on our team and are dedicated to caring for your pet’s emotional well-being as well as his or her physical well-being.

Can you imagine telling your dog, “Let’s go to the vet!” and seeing her tail wag? How about getting out your cat’s carrier and seeing him come running?

You won’t need to imagine it if they visit Dr. Sherrock and her staff. That’s because they are part of a new initiative sweeping veterinary medicine designed to ease the stress, fear, and anxiety so many pets experience while at the veterinarian.

Known as Fear FreeSM, the training and certification program helps veterinarians modify their procedures, handling, and facilities to help pets feel safe and comfortable while receiving the medical care they need.

To become certified, veterinarians and veterinary staff are required to complete a comprehensive, 8-part educational course and exam. They also have to take continuing education to remain certified.

Utilization of Fear Free methods and protocols leads to reduction or removal of anxiety triggers, which creates an experience that is rewarding and safer for all involved including pets, their owners, and veterinary health care teams. Learn more at www.fearfreepets.com.

Questions on how we meet this goal?

Cat Friendly

Cat Friendly

The cat is king. With cats being the most beloved pet in the country, there is a growing need to improve the health care and overall well-being of the feline population. Whether it’s a routine checkup or special visit, the staff here at Hope is committed to ensuring that cats get the best care. And, to further its dedication, the clinic recently implemented the Cat Friendly Practice (CFP) program to offer pet owners more at every phase of the cat’s health care process.

We are committed to providing quality care to our feline patients. When we heard about the CFP program, we knew it was time to take a fresh look at the practice to determine what could be done to make the veterinary visit more positive for cats and cat owners.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) pioneered the CFP program to provide a framework for creating a positive practice environment for cats, including medical care that supports the cat’s unique needs and knowledgeable staff members who understand feline-friendly handling. “The AAFP realizes that cats present unique challenges before, during, and after a veterinary visit,” said Dr. Susan Little, DVM, DABVP (Feline) & President, American Association of Feline Practitioners. “Some things that can cause a cat anxiety include aversion to carriers, sensitivity to new sights and smells, and the added stress of an unfamiliar location or experience. Understanding these obstacles helped to shape the CFP program and its dedication to putting the needs of cats first.” At a CFP-designated clinic, the veterinary staff incorporates cat-friendly features into the physical environment of the practice including special waiting rooms or waiting accommodations, feline-sensitive examination rooms and ward facilities, and equipment appropriate specifically for cats.

We also approach cat care in a different manner. We learned how to understand the needs of the cat such as how to interpret a cat’s facial expression and body language. Furthermore, we are well-trained in alternate techniques to calm an anxious cat and ensure that exams and procedures do not escalate anxiety